Mid-March Local Food from Willing Hands!

Every Fall, Willing Hands collaborates with local orchards and a cadre of volunteer gleaners, to bring in a harvest of apples for food pantries, community dinners, and other organizations that distribute needed food. Tons of apples are collected; some are put in cold storage for later use. This year, when a portion of those apples developed soft spots a new project was born – applesauce-making!

Volunteers picked up sacks of cold storage apples and took them home to cook.

A team of applesauce makers then finished the processing of all those cooked apples.  The LISTEN Community Dinner site offered their commercial kitchen for the project and over 85 quarts of applesauce were made.

The Listen Community Dinner site has been serving fresh applesauce all this week and additional quarts have been delivered to many Willing Hands distribution sites. What a wonderful collaboration for reducing food waste and feeding hungry people local food in March!    (Thanks to Frank Easton for most of these photos.)

 

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Vermont Bean Crafters: Local, Plant-based, Prepared Foods

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I have only just learned about Vermont Bean Crafters (though they have been in business for several years) and tried their falafel recently.  Delicious! They also sell frozen black bean burgers, sweet potato burgers, and hummish and make an effort to use organic and local/regional ingredients. (I found mine in the freezer section of the Upper Valley Food Coop in White River Jct. Vt.)

This is what they say about their falafel: This is a falafel intended to be baked, rather than fried; making it a more nutritious shade of delicious. Instead of cooking the chickpeas, we sprout them to increase texture, flavor and available nutrition. Packed with authentic Middle Eastern flavors; like cumin and coriander this recipe holds true to its roots. We hold true to our own by incorporating unconventional ingredients that allow us use more local and organic elements.

And take a look at the description of ingredients in their black bean burger: Sautéed onions, sunflower seeds, buckwheat, cumin, and rosemary pack this burger with great taste and texture. Though organic black turtle beans are the main ingredient, freshly dug carrots and raw kale round out the flavor.

And the sweet potato burgerWe oven-roast sweet potatoes and corn and incorporate these sweet veggies with fresh parsley and carrots. We’ve created our own maple-chipotlé BBQ sauce to brighten the burger’s savory soul.

Hummish: We took some time to develop a bean spread that utilizes regionally-grown ingredients: soldier beans, sunflower oil and apple cider vinegar. Use this spread as you would hummus: on a sandwich, in a falafel wrap or part of an appetizer plate.

 

Vermont Bean Crafters collaborate with neighboring growers. Vegetables, grains, herbs, beans, vinegars and oils are sourced from the following farms:

 

Burnt Rock Farm, Huntington, VT

Dog River Farm, Berlin, VT

Dwight Miller and Sons, E. Dummerston, VT

Genessee Valley Bean Co, Caledonia, NY

Georgia Mountain Maple, Milton, VT

Green Thumb Farms, Fryeburg, ME

Harlow Farm, Westminster, VT

Hoolie Flats, East Calais, VT

Intervale Community Farm, Burlington, VT

Jericho Settlers Farm, Jericho, VT

Kingdom Maple, Westfield, VT

Kingsbury Market Garden, Warren, VT

Maine Grains, Skowhegan, ME

Maple Wind Farm, Huntington, VT

Pete’s Greens, Craftsbury, VT

Schilitz Farms, North Lawrence, NY

Stony Brook Whole Hearted Foods, Geneva, NY

Teeny Tiny Spice Company, Harrisonburg, VA

Woods Market Garden, Brandon, VT

I am looking forward to trying all their products!

 

 




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L.A. Localvore Food Swap

My daughter Alisa, who lives in North East Los Angeles, sent photos today of her neighborhood food swap. In spite of living in a densely-populated neighborhood, she gardens, has fruit trees, and keeps chickens, as do many of her neighbors . . .  not what one thinks when imagining life in L. A.  Today, she was able to bring a few eggs, mint, and 23 pounds of fava beans to the food swap.

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In exchange, she brought home grapefruits, Meyer lemons, herbs, celery, lettuce, arugula, chard, fennel and avocados.

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Imagine having such bounty at this time of year in our Upper Valley gardens!

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And where do you think you are taking that egg?!

 

 

 




 

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Free-Range Hens at Sunrise Farm

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I love that the red laying hens at Sunrise Farm in WRJ, VT have a large protected space in which to range freely.  They can supplement their diet with seeds and bugs. They lay  eggs in the morning and roost at night in a mobile chicken coop. As the coop is moved, the valuable nutrients from their manure are distributed around the farm. Their Non-GMO eggs are now available at the farm. (Their quality of life is so much better than the lives of most hens!)

Sunrise Farm still has a few CSA openings .

*Half a year of certified-organic veggies starting late April / early May

*Free choice of pickup days, Mondays or Thursday, 11 AM to 6 PM

*Market-style choice of veggies each week, per usual

*Pick-your-own herbs, flowers, and veggies, per usual

*Cost: $660 full share; $380 half share

For those of you interested in half shares, you can either split a full share with a friend, alternating pickup weeks, or purchase a half share on your own.

https://www.sunrisefarmvt.com/

 

 

 




 

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Zucchini Corn Fritters

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This morning’s breakfast: Zucchini Corn Fritters with onion, garlic, cumin, oregano and sriracha – delicious! The zucchini, onion, garlic, and oregano are from my garden, the corn from Killdeer Farm, and the egg from Sunrise Farm. Flour from King Arthur. (A good way to avoid plastic is to grow your own food or buy directly from a local farm reusing your own bags. I wish sriracha did not come in a plastic container!) Zucchini pie; chocolate zucchini cake; zucchini bread; sauteed zucchini and onions tossed with pasta, toasted walnuts and Parmesan;  zucchini quesadillas . . . ’tis the season to be eating zucchini, breakfast, lunch, and dinner!

Did you celebrate “Sneak Zucchini on a Neighbor’s Porch Day” on August 8th?

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Mushroom Experiment at Poverty Lane Orchards

When Lebanon’s Energy and Facilities Manager, Tad Mongomery, first toured Canillas Community Garden this spring, it was fungus on a dead tree stump that immediately attracted his attention.

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“Dryad’s Saddle” he observed, “They’re edible if you get them young.”  Who knew mushroom foraging was among Tad’s many talents and interests? So it came as no surprise to learn that he is currently conducting an experiment with morel mushrooms in Lebanon. Rather than foraging for these elusive and highly-valued mushrooms, Tad is attempting to cultivate them under apple trees at Poverty Lane Orchards. Read more

 

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Chlorpyrifos?

 

 

Chlorpyrifos (“klor-PEER-a-foss”) is an insecticide sprayed as a fine mist on many U.S. crops, including apples, oranges, strawberries, broccoli, almonds, walnuts, cherries, peaches, pears, corn, and wheat. It is linked to brain damage and developmental delays in children. People come into contact mostly through food, tainted drinking water, and “spray mist,” a fog generated by spraying pesticides over fields.

In agricultural communities near factory farms, chlorpyrifos residue can be found on picnic benches, lawns, and playground equipment. The EPA proposed a complete ban on chlorpyrifos in 2015, citing significant risks to children and farmworkers. In a risk analysis published in 2016, the agency said children were exposed to up to 140 times the safe levels of the pesticide through food alone. Scott Pruitt, head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), ignored the recommendations of his agency’s own scientists and rejected a ban on chlorpyrifos.

Knowing where our food comes from is important to Localvores and you can be sure of avoiding Chlorpyrifos if your fruits and veggies come from the local farms listed below:

These area farms say they don’t use chlorpyrifos:

  • 4 Corners Farm, Newbury, Vt. *
  • Champlain Orchards, Shoreham, Vt. *
  • Crossroad Farm, Post Mills, Vt. *
  • Deep Meadow, Ascutney, Vt. *
  • Edgewater Farm, Plainfield, N.H. *
  • Glacial Grooves, Etna, N.H. *
  • Killdeer Farm, Norwich, Vt. *
  • Long Wind Farm, East Thetford, Vt. *
  • Luna Bleu Farm, Royalton, Vt. *
  • MacLennan Farm, Windsor, Vt. *
  • Pete’s Greens, Craftsbury, Vt. *
  • Pierson Farm, Bradford, Vt. *
  • RT 5 Farm, Fairlee, Vt. *
  • Spring Ledge Farm, New London, N.H. *
  • Sunny Brook Farm, Sharon, Vt. *
  • Sunrise Organic Farm, White River Junction, Vt. *
  • Sweetland Farm, Norwich, Vt.
  • Walhowdon Farm, Lebanon, N.H. *

✱ These farms are Co-op suppliers.

For an update see http://coopnews.coop/a-year-ago-the-government-rejected-a-ban-on-this-pesticide-where-do-things-stand-today/

The Co-op’s original article on Chlorpyrifos is at http://coopnews.coop/the-government-refused-to-ban-this-pesticide-here-are-some-local-farms-who-wont-use-it/

 

Update: 

August 2018

Court Orders E.P.A. to Ban Chlorpyrifos, Pesticide Tied to Children’s …

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